Foreign relations of india and pakistan relationship

foreign relations of india and pakistan relationship

Pakistani new FM wants to visit Afghanistan and offers dialogue to India. The People Next Door: The Curious History of India's Relations with Pakistan, foreign and economic policy of the Indian Government towards Pakistan?. Content Owned by Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India. Visitors: , Page last updated on: 4/1/ Working hours at Headquarters 9:

Both sides agree to share information on the latitudes and longitudes of all nuclear installations. This agreement is later ratified, and the two countries share information on January 1 each year since then.

Muslim political parties, after accusing the state government of rigging the state legislative elections, form militant wings. Pakistan says that it gives its "moral and diplomatic" support to the movement, reiterating its call for the earlier UN-sponsored referendum. India says that Pakistan is supporting the insurgency by providing weapons and training to fighters, terming attacks against it in Kashmir "cross-border terrorism".

Militant groups taking part in the fight in Kashmir continue to emerge through the s, in part fuelled by a large influx of "mujahideen" who took part in the Afghan war against the Soviets in the s. Pakistan responds by detonating six nuclear devices of its own in the Chaghai Hills.

The tests result in international sanctions being placed on both countries. In the same year, both countries carry out tests of long-range missiles. The two sign the Lahore Declaration, the first major agreement between the two countries since the Simla Accord. Some of the diplomatic gains are eroded, however, after the Kargil conflict breaks out in May. In OctoberGeneral Pervez Musharraf, the Pakistani chief of army staff, leads a military coup, deposing Nawaz Sharif, the then prime minister, and installing himself as the head of the government.

Indian foreign policy in a changing world

Following that attack, Farooq Abdullah, the chief minister of Indian-administered Kashmir, calls on the Indian government to launch a full-scale military operation against alleged training camps in Pakistan. That summit collapses after two days, with both sides unable to reach agreement on the core issue of Kashmir.

On December 13, an armed attack on the Indian parliament in New Delhi leaves 14 people dead. India blames Lashkar-e-Taiba and Jaish-e-Muhammad for the attacks. The attacks lead to a massing of India's and Pakistan's militaries along the LoC. The standoff only ends in Octoberafter international mediation. This year marks the beginning of the Composite Dialogue Process, in which bilateral meetings are held between officials at various levels of government including foreign ministers, foreign secretaries, military officers, border security officials, anti-narcotics officials and nuclear experts.

In November, on the eve of a visit to Jammu and Kashmir, the new Indian prime minister, Manmohan Singh, announces that India will be reducing its deployment of troops there. The fifth round of talks regarding the review of nuclear and ballistic missile-related CBMs is held as part of the Composite Dialogue Process.

This was the first major military standoff between India and Pakistan since the Kargil War in The military buildup was initiated by India responding to a Indian Parliament attack and the Jammu and Kashmir legislative assembly attack.

At least 68 people were killed, mostly Pakistani civilians but also some Indian security personnel and civilians. The sole surviving gunman Ajmal Kasab who was arrested during the attacks was found to be a Pakistani national. This fact was acknowledged by Pakistani authorities. Islamabad resisted the claims and demanded evidence.

India provided evidence in the form of interrogations, weapons, candy wrappers, Pakistani Brand Milk Packets, and telephone sets. They also said that, given the sophistication of the attacks, the perpetrators "must have had the support of some official agencies in Pakistan".

foreign relations of india and pakistan relationship

India and weapons of mass destructionPakistan and weapons of mass destructionand nuclear race India has a long history of development of nuclear weapons. InIndia's nuclear program was aimed at the development of nuclear weapons, with Indira Gandhi carefully overseeing the development of weapons.

Starting preparations for a nuclear test inIndia finally exploded its first nuclear bomb in Pokhran test range, codename Smiling Buddhain No official announcements of such cold tests were made by Pakistan government. Ina mutual understanding was reached between the two countries in which each pledged not to attack nuclear facilities. Agreements on cultural exchanges and civil aviation were also initiated, also in Pokhran-II which invited Pakistan to follow the latter's step and performed its own atomic tests see: Talks and other confidence building measures After the war, Pakistan and India made slow progress towards the normalisation of relations.

They signed the Simla Agreementby which India would return all Pakistani personnel over 90, and captured territory in the west, and the two countries would "settle their differences by peaceful means through bilateral negotiations.

Timeline: India-Pakistan relations | News | Al Jazeera

The Prime Ministers of Pakistan and India met twice and the foreign secretaries conducted three rounds of talks. In Junethe foreign secretaries identified eight "outstanding issues" around which continuing talks would be focused.

The conflict over the status of Kashmir, referred by India as Jammu and Kashmiran issue since Independence, remains the major stumbling block in their dialogue. It however refuses to abide by the previous part of the resolution, which calls for it to vacate all territories occupied. In Septemberthe talks broke down over the structure of how to deal with the issues of Kashmir, and peace and security.

Pakistan advocated that the issues be treated by separate working groups. India responded that the two issues be taken up along with six others on a simultaneous basis. Attempts to restart dialogue between the two nations were given a major boost by the February meeting of both Prime Ministers in Lahore and their signing of three agreements.

A subsequent military coup in Pakistan that overturned the democratically elected Nawaz Sharif government in October of the same year also proved a setback to relations. The talks fell through.

India–Pakistan relations

On 20 Junewith a new government in place in India, both countries agreed to extend a nuclear testing ban and to set up a hotline between their foreign secretaries aimed at preventing misunderstandings that might lead to a nuclear war. Manmohan Singh become prime minister of India in Maythe Punjab provincial Government declared it would develop Gahhis place of birth, as a model village in his honour and name a school after him.

There are two main reasons for this: Moreover, coming under intense international pressure, Islamabad was compelled to take actions against the militants' training camps on its territory. Inthe two countries also agreed upon decreasing the number of troops present in the region.

Under pressure, Kashmiri militant organisations made an offer for talks and negotiations with New Delhi, which India welcomed. India's Border Security Force blamed the Pakistani military for providing cover-fire for the terrorists whenever they infiltrated into Indian territory from Pakistan.

Pakistan in turn has also blamed India for providing support to terrorist organisations operating in Pakistan such as the BLA.

InPakistan's information minister, Sheikh Rashid, was alleged to have run a terrorist training camp in in N. The Pakistani government dismissed the charges against its minister as an attempt to hamper the ongoing peace process between the two neighbours. Both India and Pakistan have launched several mutual confidence-building measures CBMs to ease tensions between the two.

foreign relations of india and pakistan relationship

These include more high-level talks, easing visa restrictions, and restarting of cricket matches between the two. There were initiatives taken by the government, for example, inviting the Prime Minister of Pakistan for the swearing in ceremony of the new PM of India, an unscheduled visit to Lahore by the Indian PM to the residence of the PM of Pakistan, which showed some signs of a positive development.

There has been a complete stoppage of talks at all levels in between the nations.

Timeline: India-Pakistan relations

Speculations, however, run that back channel talks exist. With rising discontent and a volatile situation once again in Kashmir from mid, India has accused Pakistan of adding fuel to the unrest and glorifying terrorists by declaring them, martyrs.

Terrorist attacks on security forces since have increased and the attack on the Uri Army base camp in Septemberwhere 19 Indian soldiers were killed, was also carried by an organization, which has its roots in Pakistan. The Supreme Court of Pakistan recently disqualified the PM from office, making him the second PM in the history of Pakistan to be disqualified from office. This backdrop comes at a time when the already existing India-Pakistan relations are at a low and with the disqualified PM being perceived as someone who has always wanted to improve the relationship with India, it is not a good news for India in a way.

In the ouster, surprisingly, the Pakistani Army has remained silent publicly on the issue. Some people perceive the judgment of the Supreme Court of Pakistan, as being politically motivated, with some saying there was a judicial overreach by the Court.

Also, the court has directed the National Accountability Bureau to further investigate into cases related to Panama papers. However, there are also reports that the developments are a sort of deepening the roots of democracy in Pakistan because the due process of law was followed.

India-Pakistan Relations - Terrorism, Kashmir, and Recent Issues

The disqualified PM was seen as someone who tried to pursue a better relationship with India. Thus, his ouster can have implications with the incoming new PM of Pakistan. This can be a cause of concern because of the background scenario with the relationship between both countries already fraught and the Pakistan Army indirectly flexing its muscle in the process of the ouster of the PM.

The future thus remains uncertain. Terrorism and Kashmir — The never ending issues Cross border terrorism has always been an issue. Some analysts go to the extent of saying that both nations are always in a perpetual state of war. Despite the fact the after the Kargil conflict, there was a Ceasefire Agreement signed inthere have been regular cross border ceasefire violations from the Pakistan side of the border with the trend being as such that since onwards, there has been a rise in the violations with the exception of It has killed and injured security forces as well as civilians on both the sides.

With the regime change in India, there has been a different approach to the violations.